Curiosity

The important thing is not to stop questioning. Curiosity has its own reason for existing. – Albert Einstein

It’s no secret that curiosity makes learning more effective and enjoyable. Curious pupils not only ask questions, but also actively seek out the answers.

Creating curiosity in current affairs
Be interested

In a bid to encourage pupils to read more non-fiction, Year 7 pupils spent a half term studying news articles on The Day, a news app that aims to bring the world into the classroom. Pupils were offered a wide range of articles, encompassing national and international politics, economics, science, technology, arts and media, health, sport, and the environment. The lessons inspired a range of analytical, writing and speaking activities, including philosophical debate. For pupils who wanted to learn more about a particular subject, there were opportunities for wider research through links to other articles and YouTube videos.

A curious scientist
Be a researcher

Emily in Year 7 produced an outstanding piece of work for science (for which she was also awarded an academic distinction). She went the extra mile in her particles homework to research and include additional information in her solids, liquids and gases model. She even included A-level information and she is only a year 7 pupil!

Cross-curricular curiosity
Be inquisitive

Pupils took part in a day of activities to learn about aspects of WW1 not covered by the History curriculum, designed to spark their creativity and capture their imagination. Pupils cooked for victory recreating wartime recipes such as potato chocolate biscuits; investigated gas warfare in science; learned about medical advancements that are a result of war; took part in a five-a-side football tournament, recognising the trench football match between the British and German soldiers during the Christmas of 1914; and created an outdoor art installation using a lino printing technique on soldier silhouettes.

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